Multiplication Chart - Out with the Old Multiplication Tables in with the New!

A multiplication chart can be daunting for any student. For years the multiplication tables have been taught through rote memorization. For most kids, this method is boring and NOT very effective. However, schools are trying a whole new, out-of-the-box totally crazy way to teach multiplication tables- and it works like magic! The answer is turn the upper, most difficult multiplication facts into visual, pictures that incorporate right-brain modalities of learning. 

Old Multiplication Tables vs. The New Multiplication Tables

(example of a right-brain multiplication chart)

Times Tales® is one of the new ways that schools are teaching the multiplication tables. The upper, most difficult to memorize math facts, are being taught through a mnemonic memory system. This cuts hours of rote memorization down and is a highly effective and engaging way for kids to learn. It has proven great success with children with learning disabilities and Dyscalculia. (see statistical report on Times Tales effectiveness with learning disabilities)

Learning multiplication tables has for years been what we would consider left-brain learning such as: processing numbers, analytical thinking and language. However, once a student learns the concept of multiplication, by far, the most fastest and effective ways for students to memorize the math facts is by incorporating the right-brain through visuals, imagination and emotions....yes, multiplication and emotions are a very good thing!

How Pictures, Emotions and Imagination Can Make a Child Master the Multiplication Tables

When we normally think of multiplication, we visualize a set of numbers on a grid. Through rote memorization (coupled with time...lots of time!) children eventually are able to fill out the multiplication tables' grid as the numbers magically appear in their memory. But what if the memory fails to spit out the number? Unless the student can revert back to addition (try that with 7x8), they won't be able to compute the answer. 

There's a new way to memorize the upper multiplication facts through a system that utilizes mnemonics for memorization. For those that aren't familiar with mnemonics, in the most simple of terms, it's a memory "peg" that triggers the brain to remember something. For example, when you meet someone new, you associate their name with someone with that name you already know, like your neighbor Joe. When you see new Joe, you have pictured old neighbor Joe in association with him, which triggers the name. Voila! Joe and Joe are now combined and won't be forgotten very easily. 

So what does old neighbor Joe have to do with the multiplications tables? They can both be saved in a memory bank that isn't set to be deleted right after the information is stored. This multiplication magic is set into action in the right brain. Once you incorporate the math facts with right-brain, visuals and attach a story to the numbers (mixed with a little emotion about the story) that math fact is stored indefinitely in the memory banks. 

This mnemonic method for learning multiplication tables has proven so effective that many schools within the US are switching to this way to teach their classroom the multiplication tables. 

Below are some great multiplication resources:

Leading Dyslexia Expert Susan Barton endorses Times Tales®

Free Multiplication Games

Multiplication Tables Pdfs

Multiplication Tables 1-15 

New ideas on teaching multiplication- primary math for students

Right-Brain Math

Memory Strategies -